AVP - Learn to Interact

Discuss our reviews or just talk about any old album.

Postby dherriges » Wed Jul 18, 2007 2:15 pm

When I saw them live he was doing a bit of both. I think he was practically destroying his hands after a few years of playing exclusively without sticks, so now he switches back and forth for the sake of not bleeding all the time.

I enjoyed a number of the Ganging Up on the Sun songs more when I heard them live than I do on the album. This was almost entirely because I could hear the harmonies, with both singers standing up front at mics. I just don't understand why you'd take the best aspect of their music and deemphasize it so much, in the arrangements and in the mix, but that's what they (or their producer) seem to have done for this latest album.
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Postby Yasir » Thu Jul 19, 2007 10:05 am

Talk about a fake out: I looked on RARB and saw all the replies for our album thread and got excited...and then I noticed most of the comments were about Guster, haha. Can someone start a new thread? Just a thought.
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Postby jrhailey » Thu Jul 19, 2007 10:57 am

No, Yasir. We will NOT talk about the AVP album on this thread, and we WILL continue talking about Guster, but only in a way that relates back to recorded a cappella.

dherriges wrote:I just don't understand why you'd take the best aspect of their music and deemphasize it so much, in the arrangements and in the mix, but that's what they (or their producer) seem to have done for this latest album.


Their three most recent full studio releases each featured different producers. I fell in love with Guster during their Lost and Gone Forever (produced by Steve Lillywhite) years, and then followed the band's sound through Keep It Together and Ganging Up on the Sun. I wonder what the two most recent albums would sound like with a Steve Lillywhite sound. On the flip side, if that had been the case, I can't imagine that songs like "Come Downstairs and Say Hello" and "One Man Wrecking Machine" would have the same appeal.

There's no telling what Guster's vision was for each of their albums. But the three most recent albums each had different producers, resulting in three very unique sounds. It'd be cool to see more collegiate a cappella groups experimenting with different producers either 1.) w/in an album (i.e. certain producer for ballads, another for R&B, another for guitar driven rock, etc.), or 2.) from album to album. This way, the group remains the constant, and the producer is the variable, providing a potentially interesting and helpful basis for comparison.
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Postby billhare » Thu Jul 19, 2007 11:07 am

jrhailey wrote:It'd be cool to see more collegiate a cappella groups experimenting with different producers either 1.) w/in an album (i.e. certain producer for ballads, another for R&B, another for guitar driven rock, etc.), or 2.) from album to album. This way, the group remains the constant, and the producer is the variable, providing a potentially interesting and helpful basis for comparison.


That's actually happening QUITE a bit these days. Lately, more often than not, a bunch of us producers are working on the same albums simultaneously.

The Cornell Chordials' latest album, Arrival, has at least 5 different mixer/producers on it (Tat, Dio, James Gammon, Gabe Rutman, and myself - am I forgetting anyone, James?)

Very rarely will I see a whole album through myself anymore, actually! :-)

-B

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Postby Jimmy » Thu Jul 19, 2007 8:12 pm

billhare wrote:That's actually happening QUITE a bit these days. Lately, more often than not, a bunch of us producers are working on the same albums simultaneously.

The Cornell Chordials' latest album, Arrival, has at least 5 different mixer/producers on it (Tat, Dio, James Gammon, Gabe Rutman, and myself - am I forgetting anyone, James?)

Very rarely will I see a whole album through myself anymore, actually! :-)

-B


I've noticed this and find it interesting. I would have thought that groups would prefer to stick with a single person, in order to establish a signature "sound". Perhaps that's what mastering is for? I also realize that if you have several very different genres on a CD, it might make sense to go with different producers on certain songs (i.e. some people are known for being good at hip-hop tracks, etc.)

Seems to me like it might be more cost-effective, and easier, to stick with a single mixer. What are the benefits of using so many different people? I haven't heard the Chordials CD yet, and I'm sure it's awesome... but I'm curious to see whether I'd be able to tell the difference, and how drastically, between a Bill Hare track and a Gammon track, or a Tat Tong track and a Gabe Mann track.
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Postby billhare » Thu Jul 19, 2007 9:54 pm

Jimmy wrote:Seems to me like it might be more cost-effective, and easier, to stick with a single mixer. What are the benefits of using so many different people? I haven't heard the Chordials CD yet, and I'm sure it's awesome... but I'm curious to see whether I'd be able to tell the difference, and how drastically, between a Bill Hare track and a Gammon track, or a Tat Tong track and a Gabe Mann track.


Well, pick up that album then, you won't regret it. James (Cannon), care to talk about your experience working with several mixers rather than one person?

-B

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Postby jthelegend » Thu Jul 19, 2007 10:24 pm

Hey Jimmy, i'd be glad to talk with you more about my experience working with the lot of these guys. my reasoning might be kinda lengthy tho, so shoot me an im (jthelegend07) or an email jchriscannon AT gmail DOT com and i'll chat you up.
also, go here and you can pick up your very own copy of "arrival"

nice work on crisis control btw, solid stuff!
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Postby brianhaverkate » Mon Jul 23, 2007 1:50 pm

I was under the impression he plays mostly with sticks now...hmmm. Why does the new CD sound so boring rhythmically, then?

Lost and Gone Forever is the only CD I really like. Keep it Together is okay, but it's kind of boring. I like their organic sound...low production...lots of harmonies...and extensive use of the bongos congas!

Who's AVP? :-D You guys are awesome. I already said what I thought of it.
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Postby mrmiller » Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:52 pm

haha, I don't think the new CD is rhythmically boring though, Brian. The bongos aren't the norm sound anymore, but much like the backup vocals, are mixed down to precision and are very subtle when they enter. It's a much more economic use of a really cool thing. They're on a good majority of the track, adding just a little bit of Guster flavor and rhythmic complexity while still remaining solidly mainstream palatable. I really do think it's a CD that doesn't reveal much until about 6 listens in. Give it that though, and it's pretty awesome.
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