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Re: viva dc

Postby billhare » Wed Jun 16, 2004 10:28 pm

billhare wrote:Now yes, Rebecca made a mistake

rebecca wrote:I did not make a mistake.


And you just caught me in one as well. In my mind I had typed the word "maybe" in that sentence, just as I typed the word "probably" in the next. Not to waffle on it, I just don't feel as strongly about it as others... :-)

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Re: words shmurds

Postby seth » Thu Jun 17, 2004 12:44 am

Elocomotive wrote:This issue is definitely kinda interesting in that almost all of the RARB staff seem to feel one way about the issue, and almost all of the public posters seem to feel the opposite.


Of the 17 RARB staffers, only 4 have chimed in. Are you training for the conclusion long jump? ;-)
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Postby elocomotive » Thu Jun 17, 2004 3:33 am

LOL. Funny, Seth. I just meant of those who had chimed in. Is that an event in Athens though? I've always wanted to be an Olympian.
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Postby brianhaverkate » Thu Jun 17, 2004 4:28 am

The "hub" of the east coast seems to be centralized in the NYC/Boston/DC/Maryland area. I'm not exactly sure how many groups are in each area. I'm pretty sure the majority of the groups are in the NYC/Boston area as oposed to the other two. The main reason I consider it a hub is that all of these groups can get together for concerts, festivals, and the like with relative ease because of the distance to each other. I think the two other major a cappella "hubs" of the US are the Midwest (Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio...wait, does Ohio have any groups?) and of course the West Coast (California!, Oregon, Washington). The ghost-towns of a cappella seem to be localized south of....well, just south in general.
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Postby cjmike » Thu Jun 17, 2004 5:58 am

the DC to Boston Corridor is all a part of the Megalapolis, which comprises a large chunk of the country's population density, so it makes sense that more like-minded acappella-heads will end up in this general region. Although, being a part of groups in DC, when it comes to auditioning new members, it sometimes feels like we're in an a cappella void. I use to think that DC was an a cappella vacuum, back in the days when DaVinci's Notebook and the Tone Rangers were the only acts in town, but now the list is growing steadily. Check out DC A cappella...we rock

Almost Recess (www.almostrecess.com)
Cartoon Johnny (www.cartoonjohnny.com)
Static Flow (www.staticflowlive.com)
DCVocals (www.dcvocals.com)
BlueLine (www.bluelinedc.com)
Take Note (www.takenotegroup.com)
Passing Notes (www.passingnotes.net)
DaVinci's Notebook (www.davincisnotebook.com)
Vox Populi (www.voxpopdc.com)
the Tone Rangers (www.tonerangers.com)
DC Accidentals (www.dcaccidentals.com)

Man...that's a long list. So much for having a corner on the market.

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Postby bstevens » Fri Jun 18, 2004 12:17 pm

Elocomotive wrote:LOL. Funny, Seth. I just meant of those who had chimed in. Is that an event in Athens though? I've always wanted to be an Olympian.


I don't think "Conclusion long jump" is on the list of new events. Some that I imagine made the cut include "Imperfect public transportation slalom" and the hugely popular "Pulmonary particulate filtering" relay.

As a Classicist, let me say that Athens ain't what it used to be!

Benjamin Stevens

CASA Director of Education

Educational Officer for Festivals and Events

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Postby billhare » Fri Jun 18, 2004 3:33 pm

bstevens wrote:Some that I imagine made the cut include "Imperfect public transportation slalom" and the hugely popular "Pulmonary particulate filtering" relay.

As a Classicist, let me say that Athens ain't what it used to be!


Last time I was in Athens was in 1981, and it smelled like the inside of a gas tank. I would have to think it's *better* now than it used to be 20+ years ago! ;-) Funny how a thread can change...

-B
Last edited by billhare on Fri Jun 18, 2004 3:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby billhare » Fri Jun 18, 2004 3:48 pm

yahtzeealum wrote:The ghost-towns of a cappella seem to be localized south of....well, just south in general.


That's just because there are banjos there - get rid of the banjos and the singers will come.

OK, before the hate mail comes, I'm just kidding, and actually play the banjo myself (dark secrets coming out!)

BUT - I saw so much life when I was down at SoJam that I wrote an article for the CASA newsletter entitled "The South Rises Again", and having been at the East Coast Summit in Boston only 3 weeks before, I definitely was able to compare, and was favorably impressed!

So, the seeds are there - ghost towns and distances aside, do what you can to promote and encourage A Cappella in your region - Dave Sperandio and his crew went beyond the call of duty and did a stellar job pulling in people from DC to Florida, and I think all who attended were even more dedicated than ever after they got back home. The South is definitely not a "Ghost Town" in my eyes, there's just more space between the houses!

Nothing can be done about the geography - as someone else noted, it probably has to do more with population density than interest in A Cappella.

-B

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A Cappella in the South

Postby dgooding » Tue Jun 22, 2004 9:07 am

billhare wrote:
yahtzeealum wrote:The ghost-towns of a cappella seem to be localized south of....well, just south in general.


That's just because there are banjos there - get rid of the banjos and the singers will come.

OK, before the hate mail comes, I'm just kidding, and actually play the banjo myself (dark secrets coming out!)
-B


The way I think about it is:

a) is there a reason to think that people in the South sing less than people elsewhere? (I don't think so).
b) so what are they singing (and where?)

The number one way that adults sing, in general, is in church choirs (I think that's still ahead of karaoke). And in the South, church attendance is, I believe, significantly higher than it is in the North. Add to that the popularity of Southern Gospel (99% instrumentally accompanied) and you've got, I think, a part of the answer.

The Acappella Company has done just fine being based in Paris, Tennessee, and Nashville is home to Voices of Lee, an amazing college a cappella group. But they are both Christian oriented, not "secular pop/rock" oriented, which is what most of the people on this list are focused on. If you want to find quantities of a cappella in the South, go track down some Shapenote sings... lots of people, lots of singing, just stuff you'd never expect to hear on BOCA or at a Harmony Sweepstakes.

Don Gooding
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Postby Halogen1 » Wed Jun 23, 2004 9:15 am

True, Don - there is a LOT of a cappella in the South. I can name a dozen groups off the top of my head that fall under the a cappella banner, but they don't think of themselves that way so much as they think of themselves as Christian groups. For a big listing of Christian a cappella groups by state, check out www.acadisc.com - you'll find them everywhere, with a pretty generous grouping in the South. And this site doesn't even factor in the shape-note singing crowd, the Southern Gospel groups, or the classical groups, chamber choirs, etc. - these are mostly 'contemporary' a cappella (Many of them are cover bands, singing Acappella's music, but there are some good original groups in the mix).

I'd like to see the gap between the Contemporary A Cappella and Christian A Cappella bridged a bit more, but the majority of the people on both sides view it as a one-or-the-other proposition and don't see how the two could be mixed. Granted, it might be a bit awkward to have Acappella and The Ex-Boyfriends on the same stage, but I think mixing the musical styles together a bit more could be advantageous to both camps.

In Halogen, we do a little bit of everything - we do primarily original Christian music, but we also do some of the 50's and 60's stuff, some arrangements of newer (non-twangy) country songs, you name it. Halogen and No Joe are the only groups I know of who are enjoying the benefits of both sides. I'm sure there are others - I know that 4th Avenue does it to some extent too - but I just think it would be to everyone's benefit if both sides, first of all, became aware of each other, then if they integrated a little bit.

There's my two cents...
Joshua Olive
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Postby elocomotive » Thu Jun 24, 2004 6:51 am

This thread has gotten interesting and lots of good thoughts. I agree with Josh, I think the biggest obstacle is just awareness.

In terms of Bill's comments, I gotta agree on population density and would add youth migration to that equation as well. Clearly the South has some excellent collegiate groups. The groups at the Univ. of Virginia alone get multiple CARA nominees every year.

And I think that you could safely say that most of the a cappella community is college educated (or will soon be) since colleges are where most people get exposed to and develop their a cappella skills/talent.

So, I think that issues faced for developing a cappella in the South and Midwest are similar to the issues faced for other things in these areas - young, educated adults are being drained from these regions to job centers on the West coast, around the Great Lakes, and in the Northeast. And the lower density just compounds the problem.

But I think that changing population patterns and great individual effort can change some of this, so its nice to see that happening.
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